• what do people hear

    What do people hear when you speak?

    Recently at my Barbershop singing club, a chap came up to me to say he liked the video of me. “Which one?” I asked. “The one in which you talked about first impressions.” 

    I was puzzled because no such video exists. However, he had gone on my website and seen the video on The Dos and Don’ts of Business Presentations and somehow remembered it as “You never get a second chance to make a first impression”. 

    The process in his mind probably went something like this: My video = something motivational. Embedded motivational message (from past experience) = First impressions Therefore my video = first impressions 

    I must admit it gave me pause. How often do my speeches or seminars get translated into something that I did not say, or get confused with an embedded preconception? Do folks hear what I say, or only what they want to hear? Perhaps the answer lies in better structure. 

    PKP

    ===================================

    Phillip F. Khan-Panni MBA PSA Founder

    PKP Communicators, Inaugural UK Business Speaker of the Year

    35 Hillbrow Road, Bromley, Kent BR1 4JL, UK t: 0845 165 9240 m: 07768 696254

    e: phillip@pkpcommunicators.com 

    w: www.phillipkhan-panni.com View my profile on LinkedIn:

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  • open for business

    Open for business?

    I needed to contact a senior manager in a financial institution in a foreign country,and rang her direct line. No answer. For two days. The company’s website carried only one number — for customer service. No main switchboard. The customer service line produced a garbled recorded message in three languages, and five or six options, none of which enabled me to speak to anyone who might connect me to the person I wanted. This happened three times. 

    I happened to have the business card of another senior person whom I had met at the same time as the person I was trying to contact. I rang his direct line (the only number on his card) twice. No answer. I resorted to email, sending the questions I needed to ask. Two days later, no reply. 

    The only reason I am persisting is that we have business to transact. But it does make me wonder how much business this company is losing by being so inaccessible. Sadly, they are not unique in this. For one reason or another, many companies remain similarly inaccessible, and I have to ask them, “Are you open for business?”

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  • Don’t undersell yourself

    I have just finished writing a new CV for a client. It wasn’t easy, but it gave me two satisfactions, one of which was quite unexpected.

    First, let me explain why it wasn’t easy.

    He was quite undecided which way to go with his career – creative or operational? He was well qualified to do both. But until he made that decision I couldn’t write his CV. After all, what would I be selling?

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  • Don’t undersell yourself

    I have just finished writing a new CV for a client. It wasn’t easy, but it gave me two satisfactions, one of which was quite unexpected.

    First, let me explain why it wasn’t easy.

    He was quite undecided which way to go with his career—creative or operational? …read more

    Source: CV Masterclass

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  • Under the influence of Networks

    Online networking has enabled us to communicate with more people than previously, and brought us under the influence of more streams of thought. However, having been a boarder at school and university, I sense a similar kind of influence in the dialogues that take place, the influence of the noisy.

    In the early days of my working life I encountered a rotation of colleagues who brought with them their varied life experiences, attitudes and beliefs. In the pub we would opine, debate, and even bore one another, adjusting the thrust of our arguments according to our needs to impress or keep the peace. In the process, I for one learned much, and it was relatively easy to fit in or not.

    Since becoming a solo-preneur, I have not had the same opportunities to share experiences with as many people as before, or in the same way. I turned to networking to make up the difference.

    Breakfast and lunch networks have not appealed, because I was not comfortable with weekly commitments to be with the same small bunch of people, only a minority of whom might be on my wavelength. Sharing those concerns with others at the meetings I have attended, I realised that I was not alone in my views, although others felt it would be politically incorrect to say such things.

    I looked at online networking, not just the groups I had joined, but several other groups as well. The patterns were fairly consistent. In most groups on LinkedIn, Facebook, Sunzu and elsewhere there seemed to be two bands of members: those who joined but were not very active, probably because they were fully engaged in their own working environments, and those who needed the network for their interactions.

    The latter group is much the smaller of the two, and contains a hard core of vociferous members who dominate the forums. An even smaller number of that group will be found active in more than one platform.

    Let me stress, at this point, that my research has not been scientifically conducted, and this is a subjective impression. What I have found (felt?) is a tendency for a certain set of values, attitudes and practices to dominate, in much the same way as occurred in my days as a boarder, driven by the active few.

    No surprises there, as group dynamics are pretty much the same anywhere. But it is worth being aware that the ideas, attitudes and influences in those network forums are largely those of the noisiest members. We could find ourselves influenced by a small number of people whose ‘norms’ may not be universal.

    It may explain why some people prefer to stay out of forum discussions, and others avoid online networking altogether. So what’s the answer? Clearly no one can be prescriptive, and market forces will determine which networks succeed, but I like the idea of a collaborative network, where ideas and information are shared for mutual support, in a non-combative way.

    That would be a good influence.

     

    Filed under: public speaking

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  • Under the influence of Networks

    Online networking has enabled us to communicate with more people than previously, and brought us under the influence of more streams of thought. However, having been a boarder at school and university, I sense a similar kind of influence in the dialogues that take place, the influence of the …read more

    Source: PKP Communicators WordPress.com

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  • What defines you?

    I was working on a major newspaper that was in a state of transition. Building up my team, I recruited a young man from Pakistan, in his early 20s. His background made him respectful towards the ‘old guard’, especially his elders, including one of the middle managers who were on the way out.

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  • What defines you?

    I was working on a major newspaper that was in a state of transition. Building up my team, I recruited a young man from Pakistan, in his early 20s. His background made him respectful towards the “old guard”, especially his elders, including one of the middle managers who were …read more

    Source: CV Masterclass

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  • A great Curry Evening for Jimmy Mizen

    The mayor of Lewisham, Sir Steve Bullock, supported a Curry Evening in aid of the Jimmy Mizen Foundation. Jimmy Mizen was a teenager who was murdered in South London five years ago, and his parents, Barry and Margaret set up a charity dedicated to promoting peace and community spirit among young people.

    Yak & Yeti, a Nepalese restaurant on Bromley Hill, decided to raise funds for the charity by hosting a Curry Evening, and donating all takings for the meal to the  Foundation.

    As diners arrived, they were entertained (and amazed) by a young master magician, Steve Dela, whose close up magic had them gasping. He was followed by Southern Brand, a Barbershop Quartet from the Bromley Barbershop Harmony Club, which has made the Jimmy Mizen Foundation their nominated charity for the past two years.

    It was a fine example of a local business joining hands with its customers and friends of friends to boost a local good cause.

    The diners were lavish in their praise of the food, and applauded Krishna, the restaurant’s manager, whose every move was shadowed by a cameraman from Nepalese television, who was a touch too intrusive.

    As the Chair of Trustees remarked after the meal, the Mayor is invited to large numbers of such events every year, yet he chose to attend this one.  He is clearly a man of the people, and it’s hardly surprising that he is in his third elected term of office.

    Together with a small raffle, the evening’s donations totalled nearly £930, which Gift Aiding will take past the thousand mark. Pretty good for a Curry Evening, wouldn’t you say?

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  • A great Curry Evening for Jimmy Mizen

    The mayor of Lewisham, Sir Steve Bullock, supported a Curry Evening in aid of the Jimmy Mizen Foundation. Jimmy Mizen was a teenager who was murdered in South London five years ago, and his parents, Barry and Margaret set up a charity dedicated to promoting peace and community spirit among …read more

    Source: Phillip KP WordPress.com

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